West Virginia Courtesy Patrol Celebrates 16 Year Anniversary

Story provided by Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia

The West Virginia Courtesy Patrol (WVCP) program, operated by the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia, is celebrating its sixteenth year of providing roadside assistance and services to citizens and tourists across the mountain state.  The friendly fleet of roving white trucks is designed to provide employment, training, and educational opportunities while also enhancing safety, rendering aid and assistance to disabled motorists, and addressing road related incidents or accidents.

The WVCP benefits the traveling public who use the state’s interstate highways and corridors for tourism, as well as local, and interstate commerce. Since the program’s inception on November 21, 1998, the overall statistics are as follows: 71.5 million miles logged; 2.9 million phone calls received; 291,050 vehicles assisted; 17,610 stops for debris removal; 8,455 deer, 178 bears and 3,988 other dead animals removed; 14,000 routine procedural checks; 77,533 abandoned vehicles checked; and administered first-aid 131 times and CPR 9 times.

The Courtesy Patrol program first put the state of West Virginia on the map as a result of the 1998 federal legislation known as “Welfare-to-Work”. The WVCP was recognized for its innovative approach to job creation by the United States Department of Labor and helped the state of West Virginia capture millions of dollars in high performance bonuses and matching funds due to its job placement and retention successes. 

The Courtesy Patrol plays a vital role in the state’s Homeland Security initiatives and AMBER Alert, which is a primary tool used in the search, aid and recovery of an abducted child.  Patrol operators are also trained in freeway incident management, defensive driving, First Aid and CPR.  Hours of operation are 16 hours a day (3 pm to 7 am), 7 days a week. 

Boiler Plate: 
The West Virginia Courtesy Patrol (WVCP) program, operated by the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia, is celebrating its sixteenth year of providing roadside assistance and services to citizens and tourists across the mountain state. The friendly fleet of roving white trucks is designed to provide employment, training, and educational opportunities while also enhancing safety, rendering aid and assistance to disabled motorists, and addressing road related incidents or accidents.

[Video] HOPE Crew Partnership Featured on PBS Newshour

Earlier this week, PBS Newshour aired a segment about our new HOPE Crew Partnership with the Trust for Historic Preservation and many other partners. The five minute piece focuses on the historic stable project in Shenandoah National Park, that was recently completed by a Harpers Ferry Jobs Corps / Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia HOPE Crew. We think it's a great watch and encourage you to view it below.

Mission Accomplished! Historic Stables in Shenandoah National Park Restored by 1st HOPE Crew

Photos by The Trust for Historic Preservation and The Corps Network

On Wednesday, June 4th, members of the first HOPE Crew participated in a ribbon-cutting event at the historic Skyland Stables, where they had recently completed a variety of projects to restore the stables. Corpsmembers seemed immensely proud of their work, and the skills they had gained. Some even had bonded with horses, and planned to visit them again for a ride over the summer (Sugarfoot the horse seemed to have been particularly fond of the Corpsmembers).

The historic preservation project was made possible by a large number of partners, including The Trust for Historic Preservation, Delaware North, Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia, Harper's Ferry Job Corps, Shenandoah National Park, and The Corps Network. Leaders from each organization attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

In addition to the earlier article about the project featured on 21csc.org, an article on nvdaily.com covered the story. Enjoy the before and after photos below and we look forward to additional HOPE Crew projects having similar levels of success.

Before

After

The Corps Network Partners with The National Trust for Historic Preservation to Train Next Generation of Preservation Professionals

Through “HOPE Crews” (Hands On Preservation Experience Crews), young people in Service and Conservation Corps programs nationwide will work with The Trust for Historic Preservation and other partners, including the National Park Service, to help protect and save America’s historic places.

Photos from the Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative Day in West Virginia


Check out these photos from last week's Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative. The project, led by Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia, involved the completion of 350 service projects in five days throughout southern West Virginia. Held in conjunction with the Boy Scouts of America's annual Jamboree, the event brought together Corpsmembers from CCCWV, KUPU - Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps, Northwest Piedmont Service Corps, and AmeriCorps NCCC.

Click here to read more about the event. 
 

 

 

 

Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia Enlists Help from Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps and AmeriCorps NCCC for Boy Scout Jamboree, 2013 Reach the Summit Initiative

West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin takes a moment for a photo with Corpsmembers and staff from Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia and KUPU / Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps.

Click here to see more photos from the event

For one of their most ambitious projects to date, the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia (CCCWV) agreed to lead the 2013 Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative, which will see the completion of over 350 service projects in southern West Virginia this week. According to the organizers of the initiative, "it's the nation's largest community service project of its kind in U.S. history."  

"The Initiative is remarkable and the most significant project of its kind in our nation's history," said Robert A. Martin, CEO, Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia. "Moving forward, what we accomplish over these five days of service will be a shining example of what can be accomplished when we all work together."

So who's helping out? The Boy Scouts of America are hosting their annual Jamboree in conjunction with the event, with an estimated 40,000 scouts descending upon West Virginia for fun and service. Most of the approved work includes outdoor construction, renovation, painting, landscaping or clean-up efforts. The projects are located at cemeteries, parks, schools, humane societies, historic landmarks, ball fields, and other community gathering places.

Knowing they had their hands full, CCCWV also turned to some of their best friends and partners to help out. On Tuesday, the arrival of KUPU's Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps crew caused quite a splash at the airport, where according to Charleston Gazette reporter Laura Reston, "the teenagers wore yellow leis Tuesday at the gate at Yeager and voiced a Hawaiian chant called an "Oli" to commemorate the entrance to a sacred place..." Noting the strong environmental connection many of the Corpsmembers feel coming from their state, Reston quoted Corpsmember Joshua Bailey-Belista as saying, "If you take care of the land, 'the land will take care of you.'" They also had a chance to meet the Governor of West Virginia before heading out to Pipestem State Park.

Wendy Spencer, CEO of the Corporation for National & Community Service has also headed to the event to tour sites and volunteer. Numerous crews from AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps are also there to help execute and supervise projects.

Mary Ellen Ardouny, President & CEO of The Corps Network, the national association of Service and Conservation Corps will also attend. "This is an amazing event and a large share of the credit should go to Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia which has worked for more than two years to pull this event off seamlessly and by engaging a wide number of partners."

 

Boiler Plate: 
For one of their most ambitious projects to date, the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia (CCCWV) agreed to lead the 2013 Reach the Summit Initiative, which will see the completion of over 350 service projects in southern West Virginia this week. According to the organizers of the initiative, "it's the nation's largest community service project of its kind in U.S. history."

Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia to Do 352 Community Service Projects with Boy Scouts


From West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia (CCC) has announced details on 352 community service projects that will be performed by 40,000 Boy Scouts throughout southern West Virginia next summer.

The Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative will take place during the National Scout Jamboree, scheduled in Fayette County in July 2013.

Service projects have been approved after an 18 month education, application, and assessment process.

Most of the approved work includes outdoor construction, renovation, painting, landscaping or clean-up efforts. The projects are located at cemeteries, parks, schools, humane societies, historic landmarks, ball fields, and other community gathering places.

Robert Martin, CEO of the CCC, said the project has entered a phase of coordinating the specific technical support, volunteers, and services that will be needed for each project.

“Our strength is in our ability to bring forth partnerships,” said Martin. “So we’re partnering with the National Civilian Community Corps, church groups, contractors associations, unions, students, you name it.”

“We’re trying to get into 9 different southern counties with 8000 young people per day in around 245 buses. We’re pulling the logistics together right now and it’s going to be a chore, but we’re going to get it done,” he said.

“It’s a huge undertaking.”

Continue Reading at the West Virginia Public Broadcasting Website

2009 Project of the Year: Teaching Golf to Underprivileged Youth

Winner: Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia

The Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia's popular program, The First Tee of Beckley (TFTB), engages and exposes underprivileged youth to the disciplined game of golf. Using golf as the vehicle, youth are exposed to character education in programming that integrates the fundamentals of golf and personal skills. TFTB's core values of honesty, integrity, sportsmanship, respect, confidence, responsibility, perserverance, courtesy, and judgment serve as the building blocks of the program.

Since being developed in 1997, The First Tee has achieved its mission of "impacting the lives of young people by providing learning facilities and educational programs that promote character development and life-enhancing values through the game of golf." TFTB, the first and only chapeter in West Virginia, focuses on the developmnet of area youth, particularly those at-risk, by offering all programming free of charge.

While enrolled in TFTB's programming, youth are taught the importance of giving back to the community through service and volunteer projects, are offered positive adult role models that provide the foundation and basis for participants to become mentors for younger siblings and/or peers, and postive alternatives to drug use, crime, and a sedentary lifestyle.

In 2008, TFTB engaged 225 youth at its facility and another 2,100 in area schools. The First Tee of Beckley has proven so successful that the Corps is in the process of expanding its programming throughout West Virginia. 

Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia Executive Director Robert Martin Honored as Volunteer of the Year


 

Pictured (left) Linda Pannell, WVEA representative and Robert Martin (right), recipient of the Effie Mayhan Brown Award. Pannell also nominated Martin for this prestigious award.

From the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia

Beckley, WV – Robert A. Martin, Executive Director of the non-profit Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia (CCCWV), received the prestigious Effie Mayhan Brown Award at the West Virginia Education Association’s 31st Annual Human Relations Luncheon. The award, presented on April 30, 2010, recognized Martin as an individual who exemplifies the goals and charges of the WVEA Minority Affairs Committee resulting in positive community growth and contributions. Educator Linda Pannell, who teaches at Lester Elementary, nominated Martin for this Volunteer of the Year award due to his unwavering commitment and time devoted to area youth.

For the past several winter ski seasons, Martin has provided ski clothing, equipment, rentals, lift tickets, and lessons for over 20 area youth from Raleigh & Fayette Counties at no cost to the children, ranging from as young as age 5 up to 16. He also made sure that each had transportation to and from Winterplace once a week for approximately 8 weeks during the winter ski season. Linda Pannell also assists Martin by chaperoning the children and helping to coordinate their trips to Winterplace each week. Many of the youth are from Pannell’s church and she has seen the smiles and positive impact that the skiing has had in their lives. “The children are our future leaders of tomorrow--they deserve opportunities and a chance to experience and be exposed to all that our area has to offer”, says Pannell. Robert Martin has taken such a huge interest in these kids and has made them feel like they can conquer and do anything. He does not ask nor expect anything in return – except to make sure the kids have a great time which is why I nominated him”.

Along with Pannell and her husband, Martin’s staff volunteers once a week after work with the children either helping them to ski, or simply assisting with supervision and all of the intangibles it takes to get the children ready for the slopes. None of the youth had ever skied before until Martin extended this opportunity. By the end of the ski season, everyone is skiing on their own and the grand finale is a weekend trip to Snowshoe. The interest and inquiries have increased to where Martin is currently seeking funds and ramping up volunteer recruitment efforts so that he can serve more youth and turn no one away. Plans for a trip out west are also being considered. “We want to expose the children to the best and make sure their experience is both memorable and everlasting. It is also a boost to their self esteem; it mentally and physically challenges you. Plus, it opens their eyes to so much more than just skiing”, says Martin.

Martin has served as the Executive Director of the CCCWV for the past 17 years. Robert is responsible for starting The First Tee of Beckley in 2005, which received its statewide charter in 2009 as The First Tee of West Virginia. TFTWV is a youth-development program that utilizes the game of golf to bring fundamental life skills, core values, and educational experiences to underprivileged youth that might not typically be exposed to the game. Programming seamlessly integrates life skills and nine core values: Honesty, Integrity, Sportsmanship, Respect, Confidence, Responsibility, Perseverance, Courtesy, and Judgment. Many of the same philosophies and core values of The First Tee are being integrated with the skiing program.

Martin, a veteran of the United States Army, has studied at Howard University, Grambling State University and West Virginia University College of Law. He holds a degree in Political Science and English and was selected as one of the "100 Most Outstanding Young Men in America" in 1983. Currently, Robert serves as both member and Board of Director for The Beckley-Raleigh County Chamber of Commerce and Beckley Rotary Club and is Chairman of the Board for The First Tee of West Virginia. Robert is also Chairman of the Beckley Intermodal Gateway (BIG) Steering Committee; and is a member of the Washington, DC-based Intelligent Transportation Systems of America (ITSA); and serves on the West Virginia Citizen Corps Council. Robert also volunteers as a ski instructor for the Challenged Athletes of West Virginia (CAWV), an adaptive sports program for disabled athletes located at Snowshoe.

About CCCWV

Today’s CCCWV are inheritors of the legacy of FDR's Civilian Conservation Corps; its mission is to conduct projects and programs which strengthen and revitalize our communities; provide self-esteem, educational enhancements and employment opportunities through meaningful work experiences for both youth and adults; and, to conserve, develop, and enhance our state’s natural resources. For more information about the CCCWV, call 304-254-9196 or visit www.cccwv.com.

About WVEA

The West Virginia Education Association, headquartered in Charleston, WV is the state’s largest teachers’ organization. WVEA has been making a difference for over 150 years, providing support for educators and advancing public education in the state. For more information about WVEA, call 1-800-642-8261 or visit 
www.wvea.org.